Hi Eric, I’m stuck and not sure if you can help but I thought I’d give it a shot. So me and my ex(it’s complicated) met at a party in May. I was 22 and he was 19. What I thought was a one night stand turned out to be a relationship. He said he’s faithful and doesn’t do one night stands and wanted to get to know me (he was drunk when he said this). Anyways after a month of friends with benefits and me slightly pressuring him on making me out, we started dating. Although the relationship still seemed like friends with benefits just with the added title. We would mostly hangout at my apartment, have sex, and then he would leave, everytime! I confronted him about this and he’s said it was because of his parents, even though he was an adult he had a curfew, even though it was usually around 2am when he would leave. Things were good though he made me feel good about myself, would always make me laugh, even bought me flowers after a small fight we had. Then it started going downhill when August came around. He goes to school in another state and we both knew that soon we wouldn’t be able to spend time like this anymore. He started hanging out with his friends more and bailing on plans with me. Along with that other things about his personality started to bother me so a week before I confronted him on how our relationship was not working out and how I wasn’t happy anymore I felt like he didn’t care about me like he used to. This talk was so heartbreaking, he started crying which made me start crying and we came to the decision to break up but still talk to each other to see if the long distance thing could work. He didn’t want the clean break because he said he loved me but hated how I always got mad at little things. So we left it at that. Since then we barely talked up until this week when he came home for thanksgiving break. Upon his arrival all I got was a snapchat saying he was back in town. I asked where he was and he replied saying he was at his friends. That night I awkwardly saw him for 2 seconds and left to go downtown to the bars with my friends. He said his phone was dead so when I get back I should text his friend. So I did when I got back and him and his friends were all still hanging out. I stayed up waiting for him to come over but he never showed. He texted me at 4 am saying he found a charger, and I replied by asking if he was coming over. He didn’t reply for 2 days. So I got depressed and decided I would not text him back. (I know this is my flaw, I’m a spiteful person) So after the 2 days he sent a text asking “What are you doing late tonight?” I thought it was a booty call and didn’t feel like responding anyways. The next night he asked if I wanted to come to a party, then what I was doing, and then attempted to call me but I ignored it. Today I texted him and asked when he was planning on leaving and his reply was that he already left. And this conversation lead to all the issues we had in our relationship. He doesn’t make me feel appreciated and/or loved because he doesn’t show that he cares. His words>”nothing is good enough for you, you hold ridiculous standards, and you get mad for the smallest reasons”. In my heart I know I should end it because we’re obviously not good for each other but at the same time I’m pretty sure I love him and think maybe he’ll mature when he’s older. Since he’s still 19 and I’m now 23. I do care about him a lot and he says the same for me. Do you think we could learn to accept each others flaws/ mistakes or should we just completely end things?


* Please don’t waste my time. Although everybody’s time is finite, time is much more precious to a rich person because the dichotomy between time and money is wider. Rich men have less patience for relationship games and long term courtships. He needs to know whether she wants him or not. None of this “I’m in a weird place right now” while she goes off and dates multiple men. A rich man has no problem being a friendly suitor who meets up on random occasions. But there is no way a confused woman will ever snag herself a stable rich man.
Gr 7-10–Much to her feminist mother's disapproval, “born-again normal person” Nora Fulbright has dropped the “smart girl” act that kept her “larval” in middle school and is dedicating her high school career to increasing her “popularity quotient.” She has exchanged gymnastics for varsity cheerleading, shed her chess-playing past, and dropped down from AP classes. Then chess-loving, brainiac, super-hot Adam Hood moves to town. Nora immediately goes to work masterminding a series of swaps to get closer to him, beginning with an agreement to go on a date with creepy, unpopular Mitch in exchange for a printout of Adam's class schedule. Not surprisingly, the swaps backfire, and Nora realizes that she failed to operate under the three principles of chess–foresight, caution, and circumspection. She goes into damage-control mode and manages to make good on all of her botched swaps. Although the resolution borders on being unrealistic, Valentine's tale will appeal to teen girls. In the same vein as E. Lockhart's The Disreputable History of Frankie Landau-Banks (Hyperion, 2008), the message of embracing who you are is one that teens need to hear.–Nicole Knott, Watertown High School, CTα(c) Copyright 2013. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.
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