Adding my 2 cents (via “smartphone” so forgive typos)… I have to agree with much of Sumi’s advice. I just started dating a very wealthy man. Thing is, I wasn’t looking for a rich guy. I was looking for an equal – similar level of education and intelligence, ambitious but not completely wrapped up in the rat race, reasonably attractuve, and independent. A few months ago I met someone like this, who also happens to be the very wealthy owner of an MNC and an inherited family fortune – which I didn’t learn about until the 3rd date. But I still don’t care about his money. I work hard for mine and love what I do. I have a nice but small trust fund courtesy of a father who worked his way up from nothing, which I invest for retirement and have never repent even a dime of. 2 master degrees (which I paid for myself), my fierce independence and self reliance (also courtesy of dear old dad), and taking care of myself seem to have “won” me this man’s admiration and girlfriend status. I can say this in all honesty: his intelligence, confidence, witty conversation and the confidence he carries himself with are devastatingly sexy to me! And his charming good manners and consideration have endeared him to me. I couldn’t care less if I never see a red cent if his. It’s the Man inside I want to continue seeing.
Gr 7-10–Much to her feminist mother's disapproval, “born-again normal person” Nora Fulbright has dropped the “smart girl” act that kept her “larval” in middle school and is dedicating her high school career to increasing her “popularity quotient.” She has exchanged gymnastics for varsity cheerleading, shed her chess-playing past, and dropped down from AP classes. Then chess-loving, brainiac, super-hot Adam Hood moves to town. Nora immediately goes to work masterminding a series of swaps to get closer to him, beginning with an agreement to go on a date with creepy, unpopular Mitch in exchange for a printout of Adam's class schedule. Not surprisingly, the swaps backfire, and Nora realizes that she failed to operate under the three principles of chess–foresight, caution, and circumspection. She goes into damage-control mode and manages to make good on all of her botched swaps. Although the resolution borders on being unrealistic, Valentine's tale will appeal to teen girls. In the same vein as E. Lockhart's The Disreputable History of Frankie Landau-Banks (Hyperion, 2008), the message of embracing who you are is one that teens need to hear.–Nicole Knott, Watertown High School, CTα(c) Copyright 2013. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.
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