Hi Deborah. I think you should respect his commitment to his long term relationship. His integrity is obviously one of the things you like about him. I think you should ask him if he’ll help you find a nice man like him. Maybe one of his friends might be perfect for you. From day one don’t let them take you for granted. And if your friend is their friend, he’ll be setting them a good example.

I’ve been texting a guy I’ve met online for months! He pursued me with Se viral messages before I ever responded. Now I feel like there is chemistry and he only texts sporadically at best. We haven’t physically met. He wanted to “finally meet by swinging by my place at 1 am?!? Uhm…no way. I didn’t go for that. Should I walk away or is he interested? I’m clueless. Please help!
I have a little bit of a dilemma… I have met this guy during one of my trips last year. He was fun to be around and exchanged numbers before I left. We have been messaging in WhatsApp for the last 2,5 months on regular basis… exchanging photographs, talking about daily life etc. last Sunday I had a rough road trip with my friends and I was a bit depressed as I had to send my car on a freight truck to the mechanic. Anyways I wrote him few lines explaining what happened to me. I saw he read the text but has not replied yet. At the moment my anxiety and insecurities are getting the worst out of me. Feeling a bit depressed as he has not acknowledged my bad day or sent me text saying hope I am okay. In the past he did when I hurt my shoulder. He is an archeologist and does private culture and history tours and at times lecturing.
Make sure he is not in a relationship. If he already has a girlfriend or boyfriend, it's best to be just friends. Put yourself in his shoes: Would you want another guy (or girl) to meddle in your relationship? Think about it; you would probably answer "no" to this question. Backing off is helpful to everyone: him, to yourself, and the person he’s dating. Plus, you'll find another guy eventually, so keep searching.
Sadly, the stereotype of the smart girl who thinks she must play dumb to be popular isn't a fiction. In this book, Laura Fullbright is an extremely smart girl who decides when she changes high schools that she'll hide her past academic achievements so she can become popular. She joins the cheering squad where her gymnastics experience makes her a valuable addition. Her best friend Krista who has been with the same guy since she was twelve, is pushing Laura to go out with Jake who is good looking, but dumber than a box of rocks. She's tempted. After all, hasn't her goal this year to be popular and shouldn't that include a hot boyfriend?
If there’s ever a way of knowing how to make a man fall in love with you and be a flirty tease at the same time, this is it. Men can’t resist a lingering woman’s touch. The next time you’re with him, be it clasping palms, hugging each other goodbye, or just crossing the street, let your touch linger softly for a moment longer than necessary. Your touch would be incredibly exciting for the man you like, and you’ll spark a romantic chemistry in no time. [Read: How to flirt with a guy]
Gr 7-10–Much to her feminist mother's disapproval, “born-again normal person” Nora Fulbright has dropped the “smart girl” act that kept her “larval” in middle school and is dedicating her high school career to increasing her “popularity quotient.” She has exchanged gymnastics for varsity cheerleading, shed her chess-playing past, and dropped down from AP classes. Then chess-loving, brainiac, super-hot Adam Hood moves to town. Nora immediately goes to work masterminding a series of swaps to get closer to him, beginning with an agreement to go on a date with creepy, unpopular Mitch in exchange for a printout of Adam's class schedule. Not surprisingly, the swaps backfire, and Nora realizes that she failed to operate under the three principles of chess–foresight, caution, and circumspection. She goes into damage-control mode and manages to make good on all of her botched swaps. Although the resolution borders on being unrealistic, Valentine's tale will appeal to teen girls. In the same vein as E. Lockhart's The Disreputable History of Frankie Landau-Banks (Hyperion, 2008), the message of embracing who you are is one that teens need to hear.–Nicole Knott, Watertown High School, CTα(c) Copyright 2013. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.
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