Sometimes women tend to forget that men are human beings and they also have feelings like any other person. Even though every relationship has its ups and downs, successful couples have learned how to manage the challenges they face during their relationship.Challenges come with a lot of emotions not only for women but also men.They hang in there, tackle problems, and learn how to work through the complex issues of everyday life. All relationship problems start with poor communication. If you are willing to listen to you partner and be part of the solution and not the problem, then your relationship will automatically work out for both of you.
Men are simple creatures. In fact, men are so simple that it often becomes complex if you try too hard to “figure them out.” It becomes even more difficult, when you’re hoping for a certain outcome in what you want from your man. When attempting to get something from him, whether it’s more assistance around the house, taking you out more, or buying you the new bag you’ve been eyeing, you have to remember to be..well simple.
Once he realized attraction was something he could learn, Brian spent way too much of his free time studying and practicing everything he could find on the subject. He stumbled across The Art of Charm podcast and eventually signed up for an AoC bootcamp. Excited by the progress he's made in his own life since the program, he decided to start writing for AoC to help other guys do the same. By writing about interpersonal dynamics, he’s finally able to put that psychology degree to good use. View all posts by Brian M →
LOL, whatever. Most men I know are lazy as hell while their wives coordinate nearly every part of their lives. That includes my husband who acts like he’s doing me a big favor if he puts a load of his own clothes in the washer. AS IF washing his own clothing should be considered some sort of gift to me. He’s lucky that he’s intelligent, caring, and adorable.
If there is one area I see women mess up time and again, it's in trying to define a relationship or tie a man down too soon. That's because her need to feel "safe" is in direct contrast to his innate desire for freedom and not being tied down. If you think about it, every soldier anywhere who has ever been killed in action has died trying to defend their idea of freedom.
^Relationships based on this premise are destined for failure. Relationships are based on love, friendship, mutual interests, respect, loyalty and being able to put up with your significant other’s shit after the honeymoon period is over. While a stable/successful spouse is a very desirable thing, if one’s relationship is based on money foremost, I’d expect to see the big D in the near future. Sex, money and illusions of some magical life all fade very quickly and all you’re left with is the fundamental person and all their quirks, for better or worse.
Stephanie is a junior at Lehigh University in Bethlehem, Pennsylvania where she is currently studying international relations with a minor in psychology and political science. When she's not researching and writing assigned articles for Her Campus, she is involved in extracurriculars on campus such as the Kappa Delta chapter, and Student Political Action Committee. Stephanie hopes her future consists of making the earth a more sustainable environment, helping underprivileged minorities, and advocating for women's rights. Additionally, her interests include skincare, tea, and traveling. She also really loves her dog and cat! 

Gr 7-10–Much to her feminist mother's disapproval, “born-again normal person” Nora Fulbright has dropped the “smart girl” act that kept her “larval” in middle school and is dedicating her high school career to increasing her “popularity quotient.” She has exchanged gymnastics for varsity cheerleading, shed her chess-playing past, and dropped down from AP classes. Then chess-loving, brainiac, super-hot Adam Hood moves to town. Nora immediately goes to work masterminding a series of swaps to get closer to him, beginning with an agreement to go on a date with creepy, unpopular Mitch in exchange for a printout of Adam's class schedule. Not surprisingly, the swaps backfire, and Nora realizes that she failed to operate under the three principles of chess–foresight, caution, and circumspection. She goes into damage-control mode and manages to make good on all of her botched swaps. Although the resolution borders on being unrealistic, Valentine's tale will appeal to teen girls. In the same vein as E. Lockhart's The Disreputable History of Frankie Landau-Banks (Hyperion, 2008), the message of embracing who you are is one that teens need to hear.–Nicole Knott, Watertown High School, CTα(c) Copyright 2013. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.
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