Yes, humans like to feel needed. No, they don't want to feel as though you might collapse into a boneless snivelling heap if they're not around. "A woman who knows what she likes and makes every effort to get it is very attractive," says Kerner. "In fact, when a woman like that needs someone it makes them feel all the more valuable – because it's as though she needs them specifically, rather than just any old person." 

Roleplay. The same banter techniques that work in meeting and attracting someone in person also work great over text. Initiate a scenario in which you’re already a couple in some capacity: a husband and wife headed toward divorce, a rock star and a groupie, a pair of buddy cops on the case — anything else you can think of. Bantering through made-up roleplay is great; it provides a playful way to create a shared experience that makes the other person smile and feel more connected to you by sharing what your collaborative imaginations can come up with. Examples of how to get the roleplay rolling: “Green Sparrow, I’ve got the target in my sights! Should I take the shot? Over!” or “I’m in the lab inventing a new ice cream flavor. What should I bring us home for dessert, dear?”
I’m in the early 30s, broke up with my gf and been single in the last 8 months. I don’t consider myself wealthy but based on your wealth index I’m in the upper range. Going through the dating scene now I can perfectly related to all of your points above. Gotta admit that it is not easy to find your better half so instead I am focusing to be a better me.
Gr 7-10–Much to her feminist mother's disapproval, “born-again normal person” Nora Fulbright has dropped the “smart girl” act that kept her “larval” in middle school and is dedicating her high school career to increasing her “popularity quotient.” She has exchanged gymnastics for varsity cheerleading, shed her chess-playing past, and dropped down from AP classes. Then chess-loving, brainiac, super-hot Adam Hood moves to town. Nora immediately goes to work masterminding a series of swaps to get closer to him, beginning with an agreement to go on a date with creepy, unpopular Mitch in exchange for a printout of Adam's class schedule. Not surprisingly, the swaps backfire, and Nora realizes that she failed to operate under the three principles of chess–foresight, caution, and circumspection. She goes into damage-control mode and manages to make good on all of her botched swaps. Although the resolution borders on being unrealistic, Valentine's tale will appeal to teen girls. In the same vein as E. Lockhart's The Disreputable History of Frankie Landau-Banks (Hyperion, 2008), the message of embracing who you are is one that teens need to hear.–Nicole Knott, Watertown High School, CTα(c) Copyright 2013. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.
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