I have a question. It’s similar but with a few different factors. I’ve been dating this guy for 7 months now, and we’re currently in a long distance relationship. We were dating and in the same place for 2 months, and now we’ve been long distance for almost 6 months. I’ve seen him once in this long distance time, and I’ll be seeing him again in two weeks. He’s from South Africa, but he currently works at a school in the Middle East, where I was working. A lot of my friends stayed there too, so I know many of his friends and coworkers. We really fell in love and he suggested we stay together and do the long distance thing. And he’s paying for me to come to his brothers wedding in two weeks in South Africa. He’s been planning for our future for next year, where we’re looking for schools to work at in a different country. When we’re together, everything’s great, and he’s kind and sensitive and attentive. But when we’re apart, I sometimes feel like he forgets about me. When we part initially, he’s very attentive with messages and texts and skypes and letters. He’ll say things like “you are my everything” and “I miss you” And will want to know when we’re skyping next. But after a while, especially with this longer separation (4 months), he just got really busy, and then I felt left behind. At least a text or two in the day but nothing major, no more fluffy stuff really– that only very occasionally. He likes me to send him sexts and pics and will ask for them, but sometimes he doesn’t even reply to those! We’ve had a few arguments about it because I don’t understand why he can’t find the time to send little messages anymore or even respond to the messages I send. He seems to be fine with this kind of a relationship, but since we never see each other, I want to talk more, but it makes me seem needy and makes him pull away if I bring it up. What do I do wrong? Why did he get all distant? is he trying to imply that he’s over it and doesn’t want me to come on this trip? But he sends me emails about jobs for next year, but he forgets to text “I love you.” I don’t understand! And how do I then adjust my texting style?
Gr 7-10–Much to her feminist mother's disapproval, “born-again normal person” Nora Fulbright has dropped the “smart girl” act that kept her “larval” in middle school and is dedicating her high school career to increasing her “popularity quotient.” She has exchanged gymnastics for varsity cheerleading, shed her chess-playing past, and dropped down from AP classes. Then chess-loving, brainiac, super-hot Adam Hood moves to town. Nora immediately goes to work masterminding a series of swaps to get closer to him, beginning with an agreement to go on a date with creepy, unpopular Mitch in exchange for a printout of Adam's class schedule. Not surprisingly, the swaps backfire, and Nora realizes that she failed to operate under the three principles of chess–foresight, caution, and circumspection. She goes into damage-control mode and manages to make good on all of her botched swaps. Although the resolution borders on being unrealistic, Valentine's tale will appeal to teen girls. In the same vein as E. Lockhart's The Disreputable History of Frankie Landau-Banks (Hyperion, 2008), the message of embracing who you are is one that teens need to hear.–Nicole Knott, Watertown High School, CTα(c) Copyright 2013. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.
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