I don’t care about getting a “rich” man– just a good man who can appreciate me for me. Yet it is still incredibly difficult, and I’m not sure why. Not to toot my own horn, but I do everything that is on your “women do this” list. Most of the guys I’ve dated have been in their mid thirties (I’m 26) and honestly usually know more about personal finance and money management than they do. I’m successful, own my own house, don’t depend on anyone to pay my bills, work hard, have big dreams, and know what it’s like to struggle (have lived through some childhood trauma). I never take things for granted because I learned very young that life can end in a second.


I remember a couple that came to see me in distress because they had recently learned their teenage daughter had been assaulted by a boyfriend. A major conflict arose because John was threatening to kill the boyfriend, upsetting his wife and daughter tremendously. They worried he might actually seek revenge and end up in jail. With some work, I was able to help John express his true feelings: He cried, stating that he felt responsible for what had happened—as though he should've been able to protect his daughter. He felt terribly sad that his daughter was going through such pain, and he fell justifiably angry. After he expressed the full range of his feelings, he no longer threatened to kill the young man and was better able to support his daughter in helpful ways.
I moved to LA after two years in New York, where there are a plethora of guys my age. Unfortunately, though I did go on dates, nothing stuck. Now, I’ve moved across the country. There could be a guy, even a friend of a friend (the perfect set-up!), currently living in New York who would be happy to be my boyfriend, but I’ll never know. Frequently, on the street in New York, I’d walk by a guy I could picture myself dating, and I’d want to blurt out, “What bar will you be at on Saturday, and why weren’t you also at The Jane last Saturday night like I was?!” Which brings me to:
Obviously, I’m not saying all men are this way, but I think for the most part, unless a man is born with more nurturing qualities and prefer to change diapers, cook and clean as a full time job, I’d bet guys generally don’t know much about that stuff (or would to do it to the standard a woman would prefer) and therefore prefers the woman to do most of that “stuff”.
First, let’s look at the possible reasons a man will text back and some of the common reasons he won’t. Afterward, I am going to explain some mindset shifts that will make him more likely to text back, give your relationship the best chance of succeeding and then finally give you specific tips and tricks that will increase the chance of him texting you back.

I met this guy who play in the band. I thought that he was very handsome. We started talking and he asked me for my number. We started to text for a few weeks, all of the sudden he slow down on texting me and he never even ask me out or anything. He seem like he is trying to make me ask him out. Last I texted him he never reply till now. Should I be worried about or should I even ask him why he not really answering to my text anything. That was going to be my text to him “you seem to be very busy and I don’t want to be a bother to you. Let me know if you still want to talk to me”. What should I do?
Comments like this come from people who are insecure, seething with resentment, and fearful. It sounds like you’re projecting your lack of self worth onto your ignorant concept of “feminists”. Obviously feminists threaten you terribly. Hey, if I lived a vapid life where I’d married the highest bidder to “provide for me”, I’d feel bad about myself, too. Many other women have the satisfaction and confidence of knowing they earned their own money from their accomplishments and talents; they don’t lazily consider all work to be “toil”; they are in great relationships; and they’re very attractive to boot. It obviously burns you up. :)

i really liked your page ..im a lady who's been dating guys whom have been taking me for granted but I have this friend of mine who's a guy I often talk with bout everything he understands me well I like him very much n adore him cause he's different ..he feels hurt each time I breaks up with another guy m actually falling for him but he is in a long term relationship ...sometimes he tels m all his problem and even wishes I was the one he was dating but the unfortunate part is he's says he's commited to his lady ...donno wat to do
My parents discourage our relationship because they think we are not compatible financially. They prefer me to get married to a man who is more financially independent. There are doctors going after me. My friends and colleagues also think that I should find a guy who has the same financial status and social status as me. Many people believe that there will be high chances of divorce if the wife can earn more than the husband due the ego of the men.
I don’t care about getting a “rich” man– just a good man who can appreciate me for me. Yet it is still incredibly difficult, and I’m not sure why. Not to toot my own horn, but I do everything that is on your “women do this” list. Most of the guys I’ve dated have been in their mid thirties (I’m 26) and honestly usually know more about personal finance and money management than they do. I’m successful, own my own house, don’t depend on anyone to pay my bills, work hard, have big dreams, and know what it’s like to struggle (have lived through some childhood trauma). I never take things for granted because I learned very young that life can end in a second.
First off I want to say thanks for your honest and refreshing post. It's rare and a wonderful thing for a guy to admit the challenges men face and try to act opposite of the gender stereotypes. I'm so sorry about your breakup and hope you find happiness and love. Please stay warm and loving and expressive. The right woman will appreciate it. I personally am the type who loves emotional expression in men.
Don’t make your early text messages an interview. Not only will you use up all your conversation starters before you actually meet that “guy your friend set you up with,” you’ll probably create unnecessary stress for yourself. King suggests that texts dependent on responses will leave you feeling anxious and insecure. Did they get my text? Why aren’t they answering? Did I offend them somehow? Are they ignoring me? The fewer direct questions you send their way, the fewer responses you have to stress about.
The word dating entered the American language during the Roaring Twenties. Prior to that, courtship was a matter of family and community interest. Starting around the time of the American Civil War, courtship became a private matter for couples.[8] In the early to mid 20th century in the US, women were often visited by "gentleman callers", single men who would arrive at the home of a young woman with the hopes of beginning a courtship.[9] The era of the gentleman caller ended in the early 20th century and the modern idea of dating developed.[8]
He’s playing you. 100 percent. He’s trying to make you feel bad, he’s trying to make you feel like you are making a poor choice that you are insignificant. Look, abusive men don’t have to have a hunch back or be cruel 100 percent all of the time, its a fact that the men who don’t get away with more abuse, and if you try to make things work with this guy you will only get more abuse.
Researchers at the University of Liverpool found that we're more likely to go for people who look similar to us because we perceive certain facial attributes as clues to personality. Laughter lines, frown lines, wide smiles, restrained expressions are all indications of what a person is like – sociable, friendly, shy, emotional – so we seek out people who look as though they'd be compatible with us.
This implies that if they went through a hard time financially, she’d be able to leave him with no guilt or remorse, but even if her beauty faded significantly after a given age, or any particular trait of hers that he loved her for decreased, he’d have no legitimate reason to leave, since those things could be considered “superficial” reasons to love someone, and that would work both ways.
The word dating entered the American language during the Roaring Twenties. Prior to that, courtship was a matter of family and community interest. Starting around the time of the American Civil War, courtship became a private matter for couples.[8] In the early to mid 20th century in the US, women were often visited by "gentleman callers", single men who would arrive at the home of a young woman with the hopes of beginning a courtship.[9] The era of the gentleman caller ended in the early 20th century and the modern idea of dating developed.[8]

How To Text A Guy To Keep Him Interested


Confidence is attractive. Shyness, unfortunately, can often disguise itself as disinterest, insecurity or haughtiness. Make a conscious effort to smile and make eye contact when you meet new people or spot a cute stranger at a coffee shop. Be aware of your body language and try to appear more approachable. As this will likely take practice, challenge yourself to engage with strangers on a regular basis: at the coffee shop, in the cafeteria, at a business meeting.

No guy should ever leave you waiting by the phone. You have a life and you’re not going to put if off for some guy. If a guy expects you to wait around for whenever he feels like texting you back, he needs to get off his high horse and realize that your world doesn’t revolve around him. Men aren’t God’s gift to women. If he leaves you waiting around to hear from him, send him a message of your own and just move on.
Turns out Bryce got a flesh-eating bacteria in his sinuses, which he dramatically told me could have killed him. While I dearly wish I had a picture of nearly consumed Bryce to put on this post, I more dearly want you to understand the message. USUALLY his lack of response means absolutely nothing and you giving attention to it creates a mess that never needed to be. It would be far  better for you to be the one that is “too busy” to text the guy back. Keep the power in your court as long as you can.
I know a woman who went out with a man she met on OKCupid. The chemistry wasn’t there, so they decided to be friends. He invited her to a party he was hosting, and she brought her friends. Now they’re all friends, and the ladies often ask the gentleman for advice on reading men. That’s a bonus in my book, to have a male friend who can give you a different perspective on dating than your girlfriends!
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