So let’s say you’ve been texting for awhile and he suddenly stops texting. Your first reaction might be to send him 5 more text messages in hopes of saying something that might interest him. Don’t do this! If the convo has been going for at least an hour, it may be okay to send a “Did you get my text?” message if he hasn’t responded in over 15 minutes. But other than that, don’t bombard him with eager messages- wait for him.
Neediness is crippling to the quality of any relationship (whether it’s a guy or woman acting needy) and it’s something you need to prevent from creeping into your mind at all costs.  Needy texts are guaranteed to be ignored by a guy. Personally, I don’t ignore needy texts out of cruelty – I ignore them because it’s an insatiable relationship monster that I don’t ever want to feed (metaphorically speaking).
Your comment was awesome. I’ve been single for a long time and would like to settle down. I’ve focused my career goals to a point where I’m comfortable with my life accomplishments, I continue to re-invent myself for purposes of self satisfaction as well as attracted interest for my suitor. I consider myself a woman of substance and look forward to the day when I can be appreciated fully by the man I love. Right now I’m resting in the fact that this day will come soon.
there is this guy that i like and hes a twin. i really like him a lot. everyone tells me that it looks like he likes me but when we talk about it he says that hes still not over his ex. he compliments me in every way possible but this girl told me that he said he only liked me as a friend and that it looked like his brother was the one that liked me. what can i do to find out if he likes me even if hes still not over his ex. And what can i do to make him like me? thanks for reading
Gr 7-10–Much to her feminist mother's disapproval, “born-again normal person” Nora Fulbright has dropped the “smart girl” act that kept her “larval” in middle school and is dedicating her high school career to increasing her “popularity quotient.” She has exchanged gymnastics for varsity cheerleading, shed her chess-playing past, and dropped down from AP classes. Then chess-loving, brainiac, super-hot Adam Hood moves to town. Nora immediately goes to work masterminding a series of swaps to get closer to him, beginning with an agreement to go on a date with creepy, unpopular Mitch in exchange for a printout of Adam's class schedule. Not surprisingly, the swaps backfire, and Nora realizes that she failed to operate under the three principles of chess–foresight, caution, and circumspection. She goes into damage-control mode and manages to make good on all of her botched swaps. Although the resolution borders on being unrealistic, Valentine's tale will appeal to teen girls. In the same vein as E. Lockhart's The Disreputable History of Frankie Landau-Banks (Hyperion, 2008), the message of embracing who you are is one that teens need to hear.–Nicole Knott, Watertown High School, CTα(c) Copyright 2013. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.
×