True, I have no blog and am a consumer of PF blogs only, a point not lost on me and that I freely give to Sam (backup a couple posts and read my comments), however, I call bullshit when I see it Janey. Though I disagree with Sam on occasion, I make an effort to give him a hat tip as well for the massive effort he puts into his posts-this isn’t lost on me.


I am married to a rich man… He is always busy and spends no time for me… always tired, even in bed. spends more money for his colleagues to show them their wealth than me and cares more about them than me… it was a challenge for him to catch me and after marrying my life is all for others… Ladies if you are not married, go for someone who cares about you, loves you and is ready to spend time with you…. – See more at: https://www.financialsamurai.com/how-to-get-a-rich-man-to-be-your-boyfriend-or-husband/comment-page-1/#comment-215932

I met a guy on a dating website. We went on a date which I thought, went really well. But he didn’t try to kiss me or anything, but said he’d like to see me again. We have been texting multiple times a day, and he has called me a few times. But the conversations feel like those in a friendship, and he has made no attempt to set a date to meet again. I proposed 2 dates, but he had family commitments on both, and now he is away on business for a week. It feels like very mixed signals from him. How do I know if he likes me?
Well there’s this guy that I really like but he already has a girlfriend and I already told him I liked him and he said he didn’t like me as a gf but he said that I was kind and all but. I still want to go out with him and all, is there anyway he still likes me or he probly might go out with me because I’m clueless and broken hearted that he said that I need help and tips/guides
After her death, I had many divorcees looking to ‘help me out’. I did need help as I have 3 younger kids. One woman who was a friend of my wife and is very attractive was over all the time. Well, we did end up dating. It ended after a few months. She was 49, very attractive, twice divorced, and broke. I mean broke like couldn’t pay her rent broke. I discovered from other women who know her that her showing up at my door after my wife’s death was not an accident. She began borrowing money from me. Larger and larger amounts. She talked marriage (say what? My wife, your friend, just died six months ago) She said she wanted a $10K diamond ring if we got engaged. She wanted to buy a very large, expensive house together. She liked borrowing my Audi.
Oh my Goodness! I just saw my comment from three years ago! I was reading the post on how to start a blog and stumbled on this post. Congratulations on your growth Mr Financial Samurai! I have gone on to date two rich men since my previous comment and I can say that all the points you made are true! What you failed to mention though is the complacency that being on such a relationship can sometimes bring especially if you are very young and neither established nor certain of what career path you want to take. I’m glad that I’ve been able to keep myself motivated and save obsessively otherwise I would have lost 3 years. I’m still in a relationship with 1 of them but I have decided to sponsor myself in graduate school in the USA even though my boyfriend always dismissed the idea due to distance. Like you said, he has the means to fly down whenever he wants! I’m Nigerian BTW and our men have the ‘Provider’s mentality’.
A good way to meet someone is through other people, or activities you enjoy. Some advice about being genuine: Don't take up hobbies or habits just to meet someone. If you meet him in a bar, he's liable to be a drinker. If you meet him in a house of worship, he's likely to be religious. First impressions are important, so if his first impression of you is "party person", it will be difficult to change. The same thing goes for if his first impression of you is "uptight person" or "mind-game person".
After her death, I had many divorcees looking to ‘help me out’. I did need help as I have 3 younger kids. One woman who was a friend of my wife and is very attractive was over all the time. Well, we did end up dating. It ended after a few months. She was 49, very attractive, twice divorced, and broke. I mean broke like couldn’t pay her rent broke. I discovered from other women who know her that her showing up at my door after my wife’s death was not an accident. She began borrowing money from me. Larger and larger amounts. She talked marriage (say what? My wife, your friend, just died six months ago) She said she wanted a $10K diamond ring if we got engaged. She wanted to buy a very large, expensive house together. She liked borrowing my Audi.

@Emily-I understand that girls want to be with a guy that is financially secure. It is easier to maintain a good relationship when there is even one less stressor to worry about. However, I make girls earn their own money if they want something. If they want to buy a new car or a new pair of shoes, then she has to save her money to get it or build a new income stream to pay it off. If she refuses to do this, then I take it that she doesn’t want whatever it is bad enough. Additionally, any assets that I have and bank accounts are left in my name only. She doesn’t get access to anything that I have paid for myself and I make sure that she can’t use my money to fund something that is silly and frivolous.
Gr 7-10–Much to her feminist mother's disapproval, “born-again normal person” Nora Fulbright has dropped the “smart girl” act that kept her “larval” in middle school and is dedicating her high school career to increasing her “popularity quotient.” She has exchanged gymnastics for varsity cheerleading, shed her chess-playing past, and dropped down from AP classes. Then chess-loving, brainiac, super-hot Adam Hood moves to town. Nora immediately goes to work masterminding a series of swaps to get closer to him, beginning with an agreement to go on a date with creepy, unpopular Mitch in exchange for a printout of Adam's class schedule. Not surprisingly, the swaps backfire, and Nora realizes that she failed to operate under the three principles of chess–foresight, caution, and circumspection. She goes into damage-control mode and manages to make good on all of her botched swaps. Although the resolution borders on being unrealistic, Valentine's tale will appeal to teen girls. In the same vein as E. Lockhart's The Disreputable History of Frankie Landau-Banks (Hyperion, 2008), the message of embracing who you are is one that teens need to hear.–Nicole Knott, Watertown High School, CTα(c) Copyright 2013. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.
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